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first_img Top Stories With seven words, King set Twitter on fire. Within minutes of sending the tweet, it had already been retweeted by 57 people, and popped up all over our timelines.If King is accurate — and he most likely is — the Cardinals will have a new signal caller within minutes of the window opening on Tuesday, if they’re smart.King’s tweet holds two interesting ideas. The first, is he suggesting that Kolb doesn’t have a choice about where he goes because the Cardinals want him so badly? This could be true, especially given all the rumors about Kolb heading to Arizona and the Cardinals’ supposed willingness to give Philly pretty much whatever they want.The other side to his tweet is that Kolb may finally be the solution to the Cardinals QB issues. At 26, Kolb could offer the organization a stable presence under the center that the franchise needs.Kolb could become the franchise player the Cardinals are searching for, but he’s going to come at a heavy price.Maybe King’s next tweet should say, “Hope you like cheesesteaks, DRC.” 0 Comments   Share   Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation Get used to the cacti, Kevin Kolb.less than a minute ago via TweetDeck Favorite Retweet ReplyPeter KingSI_PeterKing As the trade rumors linking Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Kevin Kolb and the Arizona Cardinals grow stronger by the second, one of the big guys has given his opinion. D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’ Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinkelast_img read more

Extinct arthropod related to blind cavedwelling crustaceans

first_imgThe fossil of an extinct, carnivorous crustacean is providing clues to its mysterious relatives’ place in the evolutionary tree. Thylacares brandonensis was found in 435-million-year-old mudstone in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. Other members of its clan, the thylacocephalans, are so bizarre that scientists confused them with barnacles and shrimp larvae. Now, in a paper published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, an international team of researchers suggests that T. brandonensis may be related to modern remipedes, blind crustaceans that resemble centipedes swimming through saltwater caves. Much like a remipede, T. brandonensis sports a highly segmented body and spiny legs that curl in front of its head to snare unwitting prey. If the scientists are right, its oddball fellow thylacocephalans may be remipede relatives, too.last_img read more