For those Americans who put us through this hell, nothing will be forgiven, or forgotten

first_imgBut this is a guy who intentionally turned his back on Americans in the face of a national emergency. A quarter million Americans are dead, and hundreds of thousands more are likely to die, because he prioritized his own reelection prospects over saving American lives. He lied about the danger of COVID-19, over and over, causing other people to lie as well. That’s not forgivable—it’s actually beyond any reasonable capacity to forgive, or forget.And yet 70 million or so Americans supported that, tried to rationalize it, and they went right back and voted for Trump. That’s what I can’t get past. Is there anything, in fact, that this person could have done that would have been a bridge too far for them?And what he’s doing right now is unforgivable as well. There’s nothing unusual about this election, other than the fact that it’s occurring during a pandemic. There has been no “fraud” or any cause for bringing 10 lawsuits to try to stop votes from being counted. It’s simply anti-American behavior. If it weren’t so dangerous, it would actually be embarrassing.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – One thing I noticed about the campaign was the preponderance of the “in-your-face” element of Trumpism. From the flags draped on pickup trucks to the obnoxious, oversized signs in their yards, to the fact that half of the voters in my precinct showed up in some type of Trump garb, whether it was a stupid hat or a T-shirt, it made me realize that these people were making known their aggression toward me. Whereas Joe Biden voters certainly supported their candidate, it was evident that Trump supporters wielded their allegiance like a bludgeon. It was intended to offend, to threaten; not only to hurt others, but to negate their existence.In other words, it was just what you’d expect by taking a magic marker out and scrawling the word “FASCIST” across huge swaths of the country. And like spoiled, full-grown infants, they were proud of themselves, as they basked in their imagined power. But there was another type, too, like the GOP poll observers I worked next to on Tuesday. Buttoned up in Oxford shirts and sweaters, they kept their nature well-disguised. Gay also talks about these types, the doctors, the lawyers, the so-called educated among Trump’s base of support.The ones who want to seem urbane. The ones who want to be invited to all the good parties. They lie to pollsters. They lie to family and friends. And when they fill out their ballots, they finally tell the truth.The truth, as Gay observes, is that what we’re seeing is all about identity politics—just not the kind conservatives would prefer to talk about. As she puts it, “There is no greater identity politics than that of white people trying to build a firewall around what remains of their empire as this country’s demographics continue to shift.”So we continue to have two Americas: one which respects democratic institutions and is willing to work for the betterment of society as a whole; and one willing to dispense with those same institutions for their own gain, by surrendering whatever shred of decency and integrity they have to someone like Donald Trump.And as Gay notes, the past few days have proved they’re still out there. They’re not going anywhere, no matter what words of solace or unity are offered.They are not concerned with the collective, because they believe any success they achieve by virtue of their white privilege is achieved by virtue of merit. They see equity as oppression. They are so terrified, in fact, that as the final votes were counted in Detroit, a group of them swarmed the venue shouting, “Stop the count.” In Arizona, others swarmed a venue shouting, “Count the votes.” The citizens of this version of America only believe in democracy that serves their interests.It will be a relief to have a president who I can comfortably refer to as a “President.” Who actually works for the good of the American people, and who doesn’t spend all his time trying to divide us all with hatred. It will be a relief not to wake up each day to some new horror or angry, monstrous  tweet from an unbalanced sociopath.But I won’t have any more illusions about my fellow citizens. I won’t forget this or forgive them for putting the rest of us through this nightmare. As Gay says, by now, I know exactly who they are. And yet, people are supporting him in this.I guess I’m wondering—and I’ve wondered this a lot over the past four years—what the hell happened to these folks?  Did they learn nothing in high school? Or college, if they went?  Didn’t their parents give them some sense of what it means to be an American citizen?Roxane Gay, writing for The New York Times, is shaking her head at this naive white boy.This is America. This is not an aberration. This is indeed our country and who the proverbial “we” are. The way this election has played out shouldn’t be a surprise if you’ve been paying attention or if you understand racism and how systemic it really is. Polling can account for a great many factors, but unless they ask about the extent to which racism motivates voters — and find a way to get honest answers on this topic — they will never be able to account for this.Some Trump voters are proud about their political affiliation. They attend his rallies. They drive around with their cars draped in Trump posters and flags and other paraphernalia. They proudly crow about America and pride and nationalism. They are the subjects of fawning profiles that aim to explain their voting tendencies as the result of “economic anxiety,” as if they are tragically misunderstood. They aren’t. We know exactly who they are.- Advertisement – This was a close election, far closer than it should have been, and there is simply no excuse for that. Yes, suburban women turned against Trump and so did a smaller group of college-educated white men, but by and large, in the face of record-shattering turnout, most of the same people who voted for him in 2016 voted for him again. And that is just sick—there is no other word for it.I can understand people voting for a scumbag like Trump because their 401ks did well over the past four years. I get the fact that most Americans don’t give a damn about anything but themselves; that’s been true forever, and it isn’t news.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Ronaldo close to another record

first_img read also:Ronaldo committed to Juve The 35-year-old, who arrived at Juventus in July 2018, scored 84 goals in the Premier League with Manchester United and 311 goals in La Liga during his time with Real Madrid. Edin Dzeko became the first player ever to score at least 50 goals in three of Europe’s top five Leagues in March 2018, reaching the milestone in Italy, England and Germany. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Juventus talisman, Cristiano Ronaldo, could become the first player in history to score at least 50 goals in the Premier League, La Liga, and Serie A when the Old Lady face Sassuolo tomorrow. The Portuguese superstar is on the verge of reaching yet another milestone, as he’s currently on 49 goals in the Italian League. Sportmediaset writes that since he has scored them in only 59 matches it can also help him become the fastest to reach 50 goals in Serie A. Ronaldo reached his 50th goal in Italy after 70 games, only beaten by Andriy Schevchenko, who is still the quickest with 69 games.Advertisementcenter_img Promoted Content7 Theories About The Death Of Our UniverseWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?20 Completely Unexpected Facts About ‘The Big Bang Theory’7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!last_img read more

Angels Q&A with Jeff Fletcher: Concern for Shohei Ohtani?

first_imgWith the Angels’ 2018 season officially underway, we accepted reader questions on our Angels Facebook page. Here are some of the questions and answers.PreviousLos Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Media document the arrival of Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani as he takes the field prior to the baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Media document the arrival of Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani as he takes the field prior to the baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, right, stretches before an opening day baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani stretches before an opening day baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani takes the field to warm up before an opening day baseball game against the Oakland Athletics, Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani follows through after hitting a single in his first major league at bat during the second inning of an opening baseball game against the Oakland Athletics, Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani follows through after hitting a single in his first major league at bat against the Oakland Athletics during the second inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani (17) is congratulated by first base coach Alfredo Griffin (4) after hitting a single in his first major league at-bat against the Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman during the second inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, right, is congratulated by Mike Trout (27) at the end of the second inning of a baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani follows through after hitting a single in his first major league at bat against the Oakland Athletics during the second inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Garrett Richards follows through on a pitch to the Oakland Athletics during the first inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)The Angels’ Kole Calhoun drops his bat after hitting a triple off A’s pitcher Kendall Graveman during the second inning of Thursday’s season opener in Oakland. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun, right, is congratulated after hitting a home run off Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman in the fourth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun, right, is congratulated by Luis Valbuena (18) after hitting a home run off Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman during the fourth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Garrett Richards works against the Oakland Athletics during the first inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Martin Maldonado connects for an RBI-double off Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman during the second inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols celebrates after hitting a home run off Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, celebrates with Kole Calhoun (56) after hitting a home run off Oakland Athletics’ Kendall Graveman during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani against the Oakland Athletics during a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani bats against the Oakland Athletics during the sixth inning of a baseball game on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Media document the arrival of Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani as he takes the field prior to the baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)NextShow Caption1 of 23Media document the arrival of Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani as he takes the field prior to the baseball game against the Oakland Athletics on Thursday, March 29, 2018 in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)ExpandQ: Angels fans are already saying Shohei Ohtani is a bust, but I’m not shocked about this coming from our fan base. But what is your take on his Spring Training? – Jared G. BrassA: Spring training is a whole different ballgame from the regular season. I think he showed some flashes of his talent as a pitcher. I don’t think he is going to be a dominant starter right away, but the same would be true even if he had a good spring. It’s just spring training. As a hitter, there are more questions. He certainly had fewer encouraging moments, but it’s still too early to judge him.I will add that he didn’t really get hit hard in spring training. In that Rockies game he gave up five singles that were not hit very hard. His biggest problem is his control, and part of that could be the difficulty in throwing a splitter in Arizona. I think it’s fair to stick with his talent and not be swayed by his ERA over 13 innings pitched with minor leaguers playing defense behind him, in thin, dry air. Just keep evaluating him as you get more info from major league games. A: They have Nick Tropeano and Parker Bridwell as 7th, 8th starters. They also believe Jaime Barria will be ready soon. John Lamb even showed some promise in the spring. I don’t think they’ll have the best rotation in the majors (or even their division, with the Astros) but they should have enough depth to contend, when combined with their offense and defense.Q: When will Andrew Heaney be back? Will he start in AAA? – Adam KnoxA: Too early to say. He threw a bullpen Tuesday, so he presumably isn’t far off. I would expect him to make a rehab start at Triple-A before he pitches in the majors.Q: Based off spring and other factors, who proved themselves to be the most consistent 6th starter for the halos for the season: Bridwell, Tropeano, or Ramírez? – Rob AspinallA: Since Tropeano is coming off Tommy John surgery and hasn’t pitched in the majors in a year and a half, it’s probably reasonable to let him get his legs under him at Triple-A. As for the other two, both performed well last year and for most of the spring. Ramirez has better stuff and is out of options, so it’s easy to make the case to go with him first. I am sure Bridwell will be up at some point, perhaps by April 12 (when they need a 6th starter).Our LA Angels coverage for this season can be found hereQ: Who will be the Halo closer in 2018? – Art CastroA: Blake Parker probably gets the first shot. However, I think it’s likely that Cam Bedrosian, and maybe even Jim Johnson, get some saves at some point. I doubt any of them will go wire to wire.Q: What has Blake Wood ever done to earn a roster spot? I really don’t understand him ever having been a lock for the roster, and I don’t understand him making the roster either. Sure, *Spring Training stats. But his regular season stats are terrible too … – Matt RuddA: The Angels like his strikeout rate (10.2 strikeouts per nine innings last year). Blake Parker’s numbers in the majors weren’t very impressive before last year, but the Angels saw something they liked.Q: Total win prediction? I say 92. Why do other columnists think they’ll only improve by 4-5 games? – Tim McMahanA: I think anything from 85 to 93 is possible. I think it’s hard to project them for too much of an improvement until we’ve seen the starters stay healthy. Also, it remains to be seen how effective the bullpen will be.Q: How long will Chris Carter stay at Triple-A? I really thought he had a great spring overall and is a proven threat. – Gary FelderA: The Angels got him mostly as insurance if someone gets hurt, so I suppose he’ll be there until someone gets hurt. Any injury to Albert Pujols, Jefry Marte or Luis Valbuena could get Carter to the majors.Editor’s note: Some questions may have been edited for clarity.Related Articles Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Q: Are the Angels privately concerned that Ohtani can’t hit? – Adam KnoxA: Not that I’ve heard. But plenty of scouts and other observers had reservations about his hitting, even before this spring. The bottom line is if Ohtani is a good pitcher, I think the anything he does offensively is a bonus. The Angels see him as a pitcher first.Q: Will Billy Eppler and Mike Scioscia put Ohtani in AAA if he becomes a liability around late May/early June? – Jorel AlfonsoA: I don’t know when this might happen, but I am sure they’ll be evaluating him every day. If they get to the point that sending him down is best for the team and for Ohtani, I’m sure they’ll do it.Q: Jeff, do u think the Angels’ rotation will hold up throughout the season? If not, who do you think they could bring up from the minors who’s MLB ready? – Christopher Brown Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros last_img read more