Jersey Boys help the Hilton Foundation to raise a record amount to support epileptic children

first_img  39 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Jersey Boys help the Hilton Foundation to raise a record amount to support epileptic children Howard Lake | 29 October 2009 | News Hilton in the Community Foundation’s Ball at the Hilton on Park Lane has proved an extraordinary success with over £370,000 raised for charity, a new record for the night, now in its ninth year.The black-tie event, held last Saturday October 24th is Hilton in the Community Foundation’s flagship fundraiser. Sponsored by Andreas Panayiotou and the Ability Group the evening’s guests, including Strictly Come Dancing contestant Lynda Bellingham and Gloria Hunniford enjoyed a champagne reception, four-course meal, and a performance from the entire cast of West-End hit show Mamma-Mia!Over £80,000 was raised from the auction alone with three guests bidding £12,000 each for the chance to appear on stage with the Jersey Boys and to then join them for dinner at the Ivy. Ryan Molloy, who plays Frankie Valli, even offered to guarantee a kiss from each of the Jersey Boys, which may have helped to increase the bidding! Other prizes included a private cooking class with Marco Pierre White and a luxury holiday to Las Vegas. Advertisement Tagged with: Events Londoncenter_img Every year the Foundation nominates a charity to receive 50% of the net funds raised on the night, with this year’s principal beneficiary being the Muir Maxwell Trust, a paediatric epilepsy charity. This half will be used to support the Trust’s purchase of epilepsy alarms to help families ensure that children are safe from dangerous night time seizures, with money for a staggering 414 epilepsy alarms raised from the event. The remaining 50% of the fundraising will all be distributed to children’s charities that are supported through the Hilton Foundation’s grant giving programme.Actor Christopher Biggins, Patron of Hilton in the Community Foundation and long-term supporter of the Muir Maxwell Trust, was the auctioneer and compere for the night. He said:“It’s always a great pleasure to be involved with the Foundation Ball and it was another spectacular night. Both Hilton in the Community Foundation and the Muir Maxwell Trust do a fantastic job in helping disadvantaged children so to raise so much to support their work is truly fantastic.”The Muir Maxwell Trust has long been advocating the use of the epilepsy alarms to provide practical support to families. Night time seizures are dangerous and there is a risk of death, so sleep deprivation for worried parents and stress for the whole family is common. The alarm makes a piercingly loud noise if a sensor detects violent movement in bed, enabling parents to act quickly; this can give peace of mind and allows many families to have a good night’s sleep for the first time in years.Dame Maureen Thomas, Hilton in the Community Foundation Trustee said:“This is always an important night in the Hilton in the Community Foundation calendar and in the current financial climate it is more vital than ever for us to support young people in need of help. We are delighted to have the Muir Maxwell Trust as this year’s principal beneficiary and hope that this event will make a big difference to their work. Epilepsy affects over 80,000 children and young people in the UK and these alarms can both save lives and bring peace of mind to many of the families affected.”Ann Maxwell, Founder and Chairman of the Muir Maxwell Trust, said:“It is a great privilege to be chosen as the charity to benefit from this wonderful fundraising evening and we would like to express our most sincere thanks to Dame Maureen Thomas of the Hilton in the Community Foundation and the amazing team who arranged the spectacular event so magnificently. The distribution of epilepsy alarms is where the work of the Muir Maxwell Trust began and whilst there is much more that the Trust does by way of practical support for our families, the epilepsy alarm is essential for the well being of the whole family. We distribute hundreds of alarms every year. Hilton in the Community Foundation could not have chosen a better way to support us.”ENDS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Radio Caracol producer flees after being threatened by gang

first_img Follow the news on Colombia ColombiaAmericas ColombiaAmericas October 21, 2020 Find out more Reports News Organisation Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders is dismayed by Radio Caracol producer Herbin Hoyos Medina’s announcement on 6 July that he is leaving Colombia after receiving a threatening message ordering him to leave the country within 72 hours. Four other journalists fled the country after receiving threats in the first half of the year. May 13, 2021 Find out more to go further RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia July 10, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio Caracol producer flees after being threatened by gang April 27, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay today at Radio Caracol producer and host Herbin Hoyos Medina’s announcement on 6 July that he is being forced to leave Colombia as a result of threats from a mysterious “Action and Justice Front for Freedom and Democracy,” which is a probably a group of former right-wing paramilitaries.“Although officially disarmed, many paramilitaries are turning into criminal gangs disguised as humanitarian groups,” the press freedom organisation said. “This situation is having a terrible impact on the press, which is in danger of extinction in many regions as more and more journalists are forced to leave.”Reporters Without Borders added: “Herbin Hoyos’ case recalls that of Hollman Morris of the Canal Uno TV station, who was recently forced to flee abroad after being threatened by the mysterious “Social Front for Peace,” another paramilitary creation. It is not enough to dismantle the armed groups of the far-right. The government, intelligence services and judicial authorities must ensure that the former paramilitaries really do give up their weapons.”Hoyos, who hosts a programme for Radio Caracol, “Las voces del secuestro” (The Voices of Captivity), produces another, “Amanecer en América, and covers Colombia’s civil war,” went to Cómbita prison in the central department of Boyacá in June to do a report on the prison conditions of people convicted of drug trafficking who are awaiting extradition to the United States.He interviewed several detainees in their cells who told him their extraditions were being organised by the judicial police, the intelligence agency known as the Administrative Department for Security (DAS), and informants working for the US Drug Enforcement Administration who seemed to think they were drug king-pins “or even Al-Qaeda collaborators.” Hoyos began receiving death threats by e-mail a few days after this visit. On 2 July he got an ultimatum from the “Action and Justice Front for Freedom and Democracy” saying: “There is no point defending delinquents who have done harm to Colombia. He who hangs out with losers is a loser too.” Threatening both Hoyos and those close to him, the message ended: “You have 72 hours to leave the country.” Hoyos announced his departure four days later.Hoyos was kidnapped from Radio Caracol’s studios on 13 March 1994 by left-wing guerrillas of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and was freed two weeks later by the army. Ever since then he has dedicated a lot of his work to covering the cases of people who are taken hostage – currently about 3,000 – in the course of a civil war that has gone on for 46 years. He has had a permanent police bodyguard since 2002.Four journalists had to flee Colombia in the first half of this year and a fifth was kidnapped. Another journalist, Gustavo Rojas Gabalo of Radio Panzemu in the northwestern town of Montería, was murdered by former members of the United Self-Defence Groups of Colombia (AUC), the main paramilitary alliance. News News RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policieslast_img read more

PIL In SC Seeks Directions To Resolve Shortage Of PPE For Health Workers

first_imgTop StoriesPIL In SC Seeks Directions To Resolve Shortage Of PPE For Health Workers Radhika Roy7 April 2020 9:06 AMShare This – xA PIL has been filed before the Supreme Court of India, seeking for directions to immediately resolve the shortage of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Kits for healthcare professionals as well as Police, Military and Para-military personnel deployed in maintaining security and law and order.The petition, filed by Advocate Amit Sahni, seeks to immediately resolve the shortage of PPE…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA PIL has been filed before the Supreme Court of India, seeking for directions to immediately resolve the shortage of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Kits for healthcare professionals as well as Police, Military and Para-military personnel deployed in maintaining security and law and order.The petition, filed by Advocate Amit Sahni, seeks to immediately resolve the shortage of PPE Kits including body coveralls, N-95 masks and 2-ply/3-ply surgical masks etc. for Healthcare Professionals including Doctors, Nursing Staff, Technician and other Staff of all Hospitals across the country.The plea also seeks for directions to the Respondents to monitor the shortage and procurement of the same on daily basis in the larger public interest. Relying upon news articles regarding the delayed delivery of protective gear and its acute shortage, the “Petitioner craves the indulgence of this Hon’ble Court to direct the Respondents to immediately resolve the shortage of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) Kits” as the safety of Health Professionals who are tirelessly putting efforts to fight against COVID-19 is at risk.Therefore, in order to ensure that the morale of the Health Workers Community is not lowered, directions are sought for the Government of Indian and all other State Governments to fulfil their duties and take the appropriate measures. Matter is listed tomorrow before a Bench comprising of Justices Ashok Bhushan and S. Ravindra Bhat.  Next Storylast_img read more

Experts worry that antivirals may mask avian influenza

first_imgAug 24, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Avian flu experts in two of the countries with the most human H5N1 avian influenza cases to date—Vietnam and Thailand—are warning that the antiviral drug oseltamivir may mask the infection and complicate laboratory detection.Menno de Jong, a virologist at an Oxford University clinical research unit in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, told Bloomberg News this week that avian influenza may go undetected in patients who take the drug days before testing. An incorrect diagnosis is problematic because it may hamper early detection of disease spread.Some countries are responding to local human H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks by distributing oseltamivir to local citizens. For example, the Jakarta Post reported this week that Indonesia’s health ministry had distributed the drug to 2,100 villagers in Garut, a district in West Java, Indonesia, where three recent cases have been documented and authorities are investigating the possibility of human-to-human transmission.Antiviral drugs such as oseltamivir are designed to reduce the duration of viral replication and should be taken within 48 hours of symptom onset, according to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. However, De Jong’s team, which observed 18 cases in Vietnam, found that analysis of nasal and throat swabs taken from patients 48 to 72 hours after beginning oseltamivir treatment was unable to detect the virus.A study of Vietnamese H5N1 cases in a September 2005 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine found that genetic evidence of the H5N1 virus could not be detected in throat swab samples until between 2 and 15 days (median 5.5 days) after illness onset.”If a patient is on oseltamivir for 3 days before the first swab is taken for diagnostic testing, it’s possible the result will be negative, but the patient could be infected,” he told Bloomberg News.To prevent the drug from masking a possible H5N1 virus infection, he advises that patients undergo testing before or soon after taking oseltamivir. Obtaining a swab sample from the patient takes only seconds and should not delay the patient’s treatment, de Jong said.Meanwhile, a public health official in Thailand expressed the same concerns about possible false-negative testing results for the H5N1 virus in patients who take oseltamivir. In an article that appeared in The Nation, a Thai daily newspaper, Paijit Warachit, director-general of the Department of Medical Sciences, said that initial laboratory tests did not detect the H5N1 virus in the country’s two most recent cases.Warachit said the disease progression may be becoming more complicated in humans, or the use of oseltamivir could be complicating the patients’ lab results. He noted that the drug is able only to prevent the virus from replicating, not destroy it, and that little of the virus was in the patients’ respiratory tract for testing.With the last two Thai cases, the avian influenza virus was found to be deeper in the respiratory tract than is typically found with other influenza viruses. Warachit said the medical staff has been told to probe deeper to obtain a complete testing specimen.Since 2004 Thailand’s health ministry has tested more than 4,000 people for the H5N1 avian influenza virus, with a 3% failure rate. However, Warachit said the failure rate has risen to 20% this year. “We need to continue our studies to see whether the virus will become more and more difficult [to detect] in the future,” he noted.See also:Sep 29, 2005, New England Journal of Medicine article on avian influenza in humanshttp://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/353/13/1374last_img read more