Infantino hails VAR ‘great success’ at Confed Cup

first_img0Shares0000FIFA President Gianni Infantino gestures as he speaks during the FIFA/LOC closing press conference of the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup at Krestovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg on July 1, 2017 © AFP / Mladen ANTONOVSAINT PETERSBURG, Russian Federation, Jul 1 – FIFA president Gianni Infantino hailed the video assistant referee (VAR) system as a “great success” at the Confederations Cup, but admitted it still needs improving.World football’s governing body is testing the system in Russia and Infantino said the six game-changing decisions the VAR has so far picked up meant “more justice and fair play”. The best example of the system’s impact came when Portugal were denied a goal in their 2-2 group stage draw against Mexico after the video assistant spotted four players were offside before Nani scored from a rebound.And in Germany’s 3-1 win over Cameroon, the referee initially sent off the wrong player before the VAR overruled the decison and Ernest Mabouka was correctly dismissed for fouling Germany’s Emre Can.“The VAR has been a great success in Russia,” said Infantino.“The video refs had the chance to intervene and there were six game-changing decisions, where they actually corrected the decison or mistake, made by the ref.“Without the VAR, we would have had a different tournament and it would have been a little less fair.“Thanks to VAR we have achieved a great thing — those big mistakes will not happen any longer.“It will always be the referee who decides and there will always be discussions, but big mistakes will be corrected and that is a great achievement after it was asked for for so many years.”Long delays while the VAR makes a decision and communicates it to the referee on the pitch have held up matches on several occasions, with Infantino conceding there is still room for improvement.“Of course it’s a test, we still need to work on the details, the speed of the decisions being taken, for example.”FIFA plan to further test and fine-tune the system in the German and Portuguese leagues next season, while Infantino in April said the technology will be used at the 2018 World Cup.Pierluigi Collina, the chairman of the FIFA refereeing committee, said Confederations Cup officials were telling him that the VAR system gave them more confidence.“The VAR is a very positive tool to help refs avoid making mistakes, it is a very positive outcome so far,” said Collina.“It’s a work in progress with the VAR system — we have only used it at 74 matches, at (last December’s) Club World Cup, the Under-20 World Cup (in June) and here.“It’s not a big number and it would be a surprise if everything was perfect after so few matches.“When we train someone without match pressure, it’s very different.“They need to be in that match situation when you know you have a very short time to get the correct interpretation to make the right decision.“We want to avoid mistakes which are remembered for years which affected the final outcome of the match or a competition.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

ECC Remains Focused on Certifyng 300 Basic Schools by 2019

first_imgStory Highlights Director of Sector Support Services at the Early Childhood Commission (ECC), Nordia Seymour-Hall, says the ECC remains focused on certifying approximately 300 basic schools by 2019. The presentations, representing proceeds raised from the 2017 MoBay City Run 5K/10K road races, were made during a brief ceremony at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Western Jamaica Campus in Montego Bay on Tuesday (March 6). “This is what we call the formative years. This is where the brain starts developing and where education – the art of learning – actually begins. These life basics include mental and physical development and are essential building blocks for life,” Mrs. Seymour-Hall added. Director of Sector Support Services at the Early Childhood Commission (ECC), Nordia Seymour-Hall, says the ECC remains focused on certifying approximately 300 basic schools by 2019.She emphasised the importance of this against the background of the early-childhood phase being regarded as one of the most critical stages of the education system.“This is what we call the formative years. This is where the brain starts developing and where education – the art of learning – actually begins. These life basics include mental and physical development and are essential building blocks for life,” Mrs. Seymour-Hall added.She was speaking at the presentation of cheques totalling $4 million to cover tuition for tertiary students as well as donations to four early-childhood institutions in western Jamaica.The presentations, representing proceeds raised from the 2017 MoBay City Run 5K/10K road races, were made during a brief ceremony at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Western Jamaica Campus in Montego Bay on Tuesday (March 6).Mrs. Seymour-Hall said it is important that educational development be spot on during the early stages of a child’s life, arguing that if something should go wrong, “it can have an effect on how the person grows and develops later” during adolescence and adulthood.She further contended that after age 25 it becomes extremely difficult, if not impossible, to alter or change what has become ingrained.“This is why we have to reach the little ones. Studies have shown that when you invest in early-childhood education you will get the desired and also quick results,” Mrs. Seymour-Hall added.Two cheques totalling $4 million dollars were presented. One for $3.5 was handed over to representatives of the UWI’s and University of Technology’s Western Campuses, Sam Sharpe Teachers’ College, and Montego Bay Community College to assist needy tertiary students enrolled at those institutions.The other cheque, for $500,000, was presented for four early-childhood institutions.“It is also important to point out that of the over 100 certified early-childhood institutions in the country, a third of them are in western Jamaica. This is why it is important to have organisations like the MoBay City Run (organising committee) lending support to the sector in this region,” Mrs. Seymour-Hall said.For his part, Acting Director for the UWI Western Jamaica Campus, Patrick Prendergast, welcomed the gesture by the MoBay City Run’s organisers, whom he lauded for displaying “both the vision and virtues” of investing in education.“There is really no substitute for a good education, and it is very encouraging to have organisations like these assisting students to realise their dreams,” he added.Since its inception in 2014, the charity run has raised and handed out more than $15 million to needy beneficiaries.last_img read more